GAW Miners Introducing Hashlet, The First Digital Cloud ...

GAW Miners to IPO "HashCoin" -- guarantees returns of 400%. In the words of Kirk Lazarus, you never go full Ponzi, man.

GAW Miners to IPO submitted by ozme to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to dogecoin [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Can someone sum the GAWMiner drama for me?

I don't follow the latest VILLAIN OF THE MONTH with the GAWMinePaycoin/Hashlets and I am kind of lost in the scamchain.
Unfortunately there is lack of posts about it on /buttcoin as far as I can tell
Can someone sum it up for me? Who is scamming who? What is "paycoin" and "hashlet" and who is the big villain this time (except for the fascist state of course)?
submitted by throwmebone to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCurrencyTrading [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to btc [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to Anarcho_Capitalism [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptocurrencyICO [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to ICOAnalysis [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoPolice [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitter by the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [email protected].
submitted by Stealthex_io to u/Stealthex_io [link] [comments]

The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History

The cryptocurrency market is often compared to the Wild West. Digital gold, lawlessness, and unlimited Internet space attract not only honest people but also rascals. Today we will show you the loudest scam projects and cyber-attacks that seriously shattered the crypto society.
PayCoin
A mix of cloud mining and Ponzi scheme, which was promoted by Geniuses at Work Corporation Miners (GAW) in 2014. These guys make the first move by renting and selling virtual HashSet miners, which helped them form a loyal audience. Seeing that this project began to go down, the team decided to invent their own coin — PayCoin. People were promised a breakthrough technology, support from banks and other organizations, huge profits, free and fast transactions all around the world. As a result, the project started just awesome, which attracted the attention of a large number of miners and users. As you can guess all creators’ promises didn’t come true — Paycoin started to fall and users filed a lot of court complaint.
In the fall of 2018, the creator of PayCoin, Joshua Garza, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, obliging investors to pay damages of $9.2 million, although the total amount of financial investments was over $54 million.
BitConnect
Do you know how to tell that you’re participating in a scam? Just start with “Wasa Wasa Wasup BitConnect” as Carlos Matos did. BitConnect platform appeared in 2016 and immediately announced its intention to join the elite of the digital economy, bringing super-profits to all project participants without exception. The essence of the criminal scheme was simple: “Invest and get 100% and more.” The organizers promised investors an income of 365% per year! After the enormous excitement of the crypto market, the cost of the BitConnect token was equal to $463. This attracted the attention of reputable persons like Mike Novogratz, Charlie Lee, and Vitalik Buterin. For example, the creator of Litecoin — Charlie Lee — twitted the following:
“From the surface, BitConnect seems like a classic Ponzi scheme. I wouldn’t invest in it and wouldn’t recommend anyone else to.”
But even after such concerns, many people continued to invest in BitConnect. However, in early January 2018, the project unexpectedly turned down all of the activities and closed its platform. Investors were left with nothing. According to general estimates, the investors were deceived for more than $2.5 billion! In the summer of 2018, the head of Bitconnect India Divyesh Darji was arrested.
Beware that on July 1, 2019, a project Bitconnect 2.0 can be launched according to the news posted on Twitterby the same-named user.
Ifan and Pincoin
Start-ups Ifan and Pincoin, owned by the Vietnamese company Modern Tech, raised a whopping $660 million from approximately 32.000 people. The majority of the victims were the citizens of Vietnam. This scam project was labeled the “largest exit scam in recent memory” by TechCrunch.Project’s marketing strategy was so perfect that it was impossible to resist. So Ifan was promoted as “the most advanced social network” for celebrities and their fans. On the other side, Pincoin attracted investors with a promised investment return of 40% per month. The creators of Pincoin wrote about the development of an online platform covering an advertising network, a service for auctions, an investment portal, and P2P platform based on the blockchain.
But in fact both ICOs used a Ponzi scheme: users invested money, received their interest, brought friends and received additional interest. After some time, Modern Tech stopped paying out dividends in fiat and invited users to switch to their own tokens. As a result, they just made a fool of the investors.
This provoked massive rallies in front of the Modern Tech office, during which investors demanded a refund. But the scammers just escaped into the night with a $660 million jackpot.
Mt.Gox
In 2014 Mt.Gox exchange platform was one of the most popular resources for Bitcoin trading: it accounted for more than 70% of all transactions with BTC. A real tidbit, isn’t it?
Unfortunately, Mt.Gox was slowly turning into chaos. In the fall of 2013, US federal agents collected $5 million from the company’s bank account, since Mt.Gox was not registered as a financial intermediary. At the same time, Coinlab, the company’s former partner, filed a lawsuit against Mt.Gox, demanding $75 million. The lawsuit stated that Mt.Gox violated the terms of the agreement with Coinlab and continued to trade in the United States and Canada.
These problems led to failures with the platform. For example, American users waited for months to withdraw funds. In February 2014, Mt.Gox stopped the withdrawal of coins at all and the CEO of Mt.Gox — Mark Karpeles — refused to give any comments. Around the same time, an internal company document became available to the press explaining the reason for the failures — over the past several years around BTC 745,000 were stolen from the service. The total amount worth around $450 million at the time! What’s more, this was approximately 7% of all Bitcoin existing at the time.
“Even the sloppiest of audits should have shown that something had gone wrong, that money was flowing out of Gox accounts.” — The Verge.
Later the 200,000 stolen Bitcoins was found on an old wallet of the company. However, approximately 650,000 remain lost forever. According to Mt.Gox version, hackers used a bug in the transaction system that existed from the first day and quietly transferred small amounts of coins to their wallets. For sure the Mt. Gox case is the biggest crypto heist in history.No doubts, scam projects, and hack attacks will continue to emerge in a crypto world. Unfortunately, there is no universal remedy from them, but here are a few tips on how to reduce the risks of being scammed:
Like and share this article if you find it useful. Want more interesting articles on the crypto world? Follow us onMedium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get Stealthex.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us at [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).
submitted by Stealthex_io to CryptoCluster [link] [comments]

The Truth About PayCoin

GAW CEO Josh Garza and his company have taken the crypto community by storm this month after their announcement of PayCoin. PayCoin (XPY) has made some headlines in the crypto community after what has been dubbed the most successful launch of an altcoin thus far.
Despite sky rocketing prices to upwards of $15 the Bitcoin community as a whole has seemed to have shunned this new self proclaimed revolutionary coin. Perhaps this is due to the mysterious nature in which Paycoin operates. Trying to gain a better understanding of this new currency I contacted XPY's creator GAW.
I have experience dealing with GAW. I purchased their Black Widow 14 Mh/s miner for a ridiculously high cost. By the time I received the hardware its price had already dropped +70% from the price I purchased it at. A lot of people lost money when buying hardware from GAW but of course GAW themselves made a killing profiting +150 M from selling the mining equipment. Proponents of XPY argue that this proves the Paycoin model has an enormous financial backing behind its development.
A grand marketing scheme paints Paycoin as the currency of the people; the currency of tomorrow. Speculation has been made solely off the fact that PayCoin has marketed itself as a currency which will be quickly adopted by the international community with ease.
PayCoin however is fundamentally different than BTC in many ways. Suspect of the whole entire operation I asked GAW what percentage of PayCoin were premined. The telephone operator told me they weren't premined they were prestaked. By that she means the currency's creators started off with their "self appointed fair share". Prestaked is a synonym for Premined. If the CEO Josh Garza decided to start himself off with say 75% of the PayCoin then he essentially just declared himself king.
We don't know the history of PayCoin there is no public ledger on a Blockchain. Its coin's entire existence seems to operate under a dark shadow of secrecy. GAW acts as the coin's creator and determiner of its fate.
PayCoin describes itself as a better alternative to Bitcoin, but is it? PayCoins are not mined like Bitcoins. They are minted, that means PayCoins are only created by generating interest. By purchasing what the company is calling hashlets one can use their system of cloud based mining to temporarily generate new coin. This is how more PayCoin are put into existence. Only GAW determines when they will sell more hashlets. So I must pay GAW to get their service they call Hashtakers which will allow you to mint new PayCoin. The more one examines this operation the more the it looks like a Ponzi scheme.
If CEO of GAW "prestaked" 10,000,000 PayCoin and sets the initial price of his currency at $20 (which is where he is placing his initial valuation) he has magically created 200 million dollars for himself and his company out of thin air. He then will only continue to make more money as users pay his company in order to put more Paycoin into existence through minting.
At every corner of the game GAW wins in this scenario, the more one begins to dissect PayCoin and the power structure behind it the more it seems like it is an elaborate scheme. After reviewing the source code many have come to the same conclusion that PayCoin is merely a clone of PeerCoin (PPC) a coin which offers fast transaction times yet has been declining in popularity in recent months. Is the recent rise of XPY just another pump and dump in the world of alt coins or is Paycoin here to stay?
Speculators have been taken back by the big engine behind the currency, however fail to see that PayCoin is different perhaps for all the wrong reasons.
PayCoin is controlled by a centralized ruling authority, the company GAW miners is its creator and ruler who rules from behind the curtain. I believe to be a viable crypto currency to the mainstream world one must gain acceptance from the crypto community that is already in existence. When the truth of how GAW dominates everything that is PayCoin comes to light it may be difficult to gain that acceptance.
submitted by OREBEL to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Looking back, ASICs were bad for Doge.

Dogecoin mining used to be amazing. Miners all over the world building these rigs, connecting to this global network of computers coming together to support this crazy idea of a decentralized/distributed crypto currency based off of a Shiba Inu. Our stupid little dog coin actually had some value, which was enough to fuel this crazy passion of mining. Then the ASICs came. They took dogecoin mining away from the common man. How long has it been since anyone has been able to break even? The only ones who really mine are a few shibes with already outdated ASICs and the big guys. The big guys like GAW and ZEUS. We can no longer profitably mine with off the shelf parts. All of mining is at the mercy of a few corporations and the silicon they develop. We have turned from a global community of miners, to the whims of a big few. I used to be able to roll over in my sleep and hear the noise of my GPU fans, to feel the heat of 100% load. I would chuckle to myself that I was crazy enough to spend my hard earned money and research enough to build this crazy machine to support Doge. Those days have passed. No ASIC on the market for a while now has been able to even suggest breaking even, and No one can recommend buying one. The few corporations we put our trust with ASICs have now actually shifted their focus to cloud mining; Literally opposite in philosophy to decentralized mining. At any moment, your cloud mining provider could take your miner from you, and you couldn't stop them. But what about the x11 coins!? What will happen when ASICs come out for x11 coins, and then x13 coins? The main reason for the creation of litecoin was it was GPU profitable as the Bitcoin ASICs started rolling in. Will we mine and kill every coin on our destructive path of ASICs? Coin mining, to be truly successful as a long term strategy should be feasible with off the shelf computing parts, and not custom silicon thats useless once its outdated.
submitted by ibayibay1 to dogemining [link] [comments]

Checking GAW against the Securities and Exchange Commission list of Ponzi Red Flags.....

I may be a bit slow but, finally, I'm getting suspicious and have begun to ask myself questions that, if I were smarter, I’d have asked before investing any money. Like, is there any proof GAW miners is mining anything at all? The answer to that is technically no, there isn't. The question then becomes where are their payouts coming from then? The official answer to this is that GAW make their money by renting out their mining power to private companies and it's this income that provides the customers with their ever diminishing payouts. Though who these companies are is a mystery. And, in any case, that seems like a peculiar business model. Why isn't GAW’s business of the sort that its website and marketing implies it is? i.e a cloud mining service that mines bitcoin and sells shares of the mining power to customers. The fact that the thing looks like a Ponzi scheme is inescapable. A smart and more worldly person would probably have spotted that straight away.
How does slow witted person like me finally identify a Ponzi scheme then? Well, he checks his experience against the US Securities and Exchange Commission list of Ponzi Scheme red flags:
  1. High investment returns with little or no risk. Every investment carries some degree of risk, and investments yielding higher returns typically involve more risk. Be highly suspicious of any "guaranteed" investment opportunity.
    1. Overly consistent returns. Investment values tend to go up and down over time, especially those offering potentially high returns. Be suspect of an investment that continues to generate regular, positive returns regardless of overall market conditions.
    2. Unregistered investments. Ponzi schemes typically involve investments that have not been registered with the SEC or with state regulators. Registration is important because it provides investors with access to key information about the company's management, products, services, and finances.
    3. Unlicensed sellers. Federal and state securities laws require investment professionals and their firms to be licensed or registered. Most Ponzi schemes involve unlicensed individuals or unregistered firms.
    4. Secretive and/or complex strategies. Avoiding investments you do not understand, or for which you cannot get complete information, is a good rule of thumb.
    5. Issues with paperwork. Do not accept excuses regarding why you cannot review information about an investment in writing. Also, account statement errors and inconsistencies may be signs that funds are not being invested as promised.
    6. Difficulty receiving payments. Be suspicious if you do not receive a payment or have difficulty cashing out your investment. Keep in mind that Ponzi scheme promoters routinely encourage participants to "roll over" investments and sometimes promise returns offering even higher returns on the amount rolled over.
Of course, GAW miners gets a few red flags but not across the board. It didn’t necessarily promise ‘high’ returns – just consistent ones that were higher than you’d receive elsewhere. Eventually these consistent and ‘higher than elsewhere’ returns became inconsistent and low. A big red flag is the company being unregistered with the Securities and Exchange Commission:
3.12 GAW as defined herein is not engaged in providing investment products, regulated commodities, or financial products of any type or kind. GAW is not registered as a securities broker-dealer or an investment adviser either with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) or with any state securities regulatory authority, and does not offer any product or service based upon the sale or acquisition of securities or derivative based products or services. GAW is neither licensed nor qualified to provide investment advice and you are specifically and adamantly advised not to rely upon anything posted/communicated/implied or expressed by GAW. - From the GAW Miners Terms and Conditions
So, it certainly is unregistered and unlicensed. The fifth red flag is particularly interesting – GAW does indeed appear to have a secretive and/or complex strategy. Far more complex and secretive than you’d think a cloud mining service needs to be. One that involves renting out mining power to unknown private companies, making payouts based on pool estimates rather than actual payments from mining, mysterious negotiations that involve over-the-horizon promises just as soon as they’re completed and a very strange ‘store credit’ type scheme in which, if we stick with the company and mine 'hashpoints' we'll be, one day, much rewarded with 'hashcoins' which will be very, very valuable.
Issues with paperwork? There isn’t any paperwork. I suppose this is an advantage of selling mining shares as if they are property rather than a contract which would necessarily involve a contract.
Finally, difficulty receiving payments. There have, I believe, been a fair few people who’ve had difficulties with withdrawing their money. The payments themselves have plummeted though whether that counts as a difficulty I don’t know. I’d be inclined to give GAW a pass on this one but just because I’ve not had the difficulty myself.
Anyway, I just wanted to put all that down here before I conclude that GAW looks very much like a Ponzi scheme and I’m a goddamned idiot for buying into it and before I go log-in to Zen cloud and panic buy every hashlet I own.
submitted by MichaelSeville to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Actual, real crypto investments?

We all know, or at least we SHOULD know, that cryptocurrencies are not an investment. Right?
The trouble is, ever since that famous $7 million bitcoin pizza, the crypto world seems to be divided between the early arrival millionaires, the wannabes, and the predators out to scam them.
And there has been a very, very long list of scammers, hasn't there? Many of the names are well known, especially the ones in jail, or heading there.
Trouble is, like a shark in a shoal of fish, they scared many away, especially the get-rich-quick crowd. Its not easy to watch your money evaporate, and the effect on the community as a whole is crippling, as the departing hordes do more damage to the cryptoconomy than the predators ever did.
Over on /asicgroupbuy, we've had our share of disasters. We had one of our own lose over $7k of our money, and then disappear, in shame or guilt. It doesn't really matter which. We were into GAW's scam, though we got out with a profit. We were gobbled up by Moolah, and most recently by Chris's LTCgear scam. We've reached a point where people are saying there's nothing left to invest in.
While cryptos aren't an investment, there are investments in the cryptosphere. Mining being an obvious one... but as we all know, the days of the small miner are well and truly over. The rewards are simply not enough to cover capital and operating costs. Don't believe me? Try it yourself, but be prepared to lose most or all of what you put in. And of course so-called 'cloud' mining is for the most part a massive con. Sure, they may pay out short term... After all, I paid for my ex-GAW Gridseeds thanks to profits from the Cointellect scam before they soured. But the numbers just don't stack up when you look hard.
And yet, we all know there IS money being made in mining. Mostly by those huge, anonymous chinese mines we've all seen pictures and videos of. Noisy, hot, dank hellholes hidden in the jungle with thousands of screaming ASICs and a couple of guys running around 24/7 keeping them going and sleeping on the floor.
But this kind of thing costs millions, and is way out of our league.

Or is it?

Yesterday, I was in town, picking up a batch of (physical, non-crypto) coins someone brought back from Sydney for me. And it was a glorious day, perfect for a leisurely stroll.
I had been looking at the Bitcoin Group's IPO, after seeing that our new Prime Minister has kicked it off with an OnMarket Bookbuilds launch. I even linked the referral on my Facebook page, not that I expect anyone to ever use it. I read the Prospectus (Note: Specifically NOT available to US citizens) and was thinking of investing. So I thought "Why not drop by their office and pick up a paper copy? Makes the form easier to fill out if I decide to buy shares."
Well, I gotta say I was impressed. I met much of the team, had a long chat with Sam, their CEO, and had all my hard questions answered. Ended up borrowing their WiFi to transfer a couple grand over for a small stake, and will likely increase it before the offer closes.
In a nutshell, they're going to ramp up their existing mines in China and Iceland to around 13% of the total BTC hashrate. The Chinese mines are located in remote areas, adjacent to hydro power stations... apparently these stations can't sell their electricity onto the grid, so they've done really good deals to supply cheap power. Current ASICs are Antminer S5's, with a mix of S5's and the coming S7's making up the 50,000+ miners to be installed. They should be generating around $35 million a year, and although they won't be paying dividends, by reinvesting profits their market cap should increase nicely. At least that's the plan.
This is a real company, very open and inviting. They even host the Melbourne Bitcoin Meetups and have a museum and facilities for public use. Here's a pic of Martin in the museum room which has examples of every miner ever built... an impressive collection of mostly black boxes. ;)
http://i.imgur.com/YHWZKID.jpg

Note that this is not an invitation to invest in this particular company!

Apart from the fact that that would be illegal in the US (although there ARE ways for americans to buy in via proxies), this post is not about one company. Rather it is about the fact that real-world opportunities DO exist, and we shouldn't let the 'Wolves and Weasels' (to borrow GoodShibe's description of them) destroy our faith in the crypto world.

Nor is this about BTC.

While Bitcoin Mining is the current most profitable way to mine, that won't necessarily hold true indefinitely. We spoke at length about next year's halving, and although our opinion on the likely outcome differed, they do have plans in place either way. Sam told me he holds significant amounts of altcoins, including Doge, and is not averse to them. While the focus is now purely on BTC, that isn't necessarily graven in stone.

Stay Active, and Keep Your Eye On The Ball!

There are most definitely legitimate opportunities in the cryptosphere. Whether its Dogecoin or Bitcoin or something else. Whether its a public float of a mining company, a new exchange, or some other business, some very smart people are doing a lot of hard work creating value out there.
But you'll never hear about it if you don't listen. Just like we all found out about that pizza long after it was too late to get aboard, if you don't pay attention, you will be sitting on the sidelines wishing you had known about the next big thing. Sure, /dogecoin isn't what it used to be. Neither are any of the other crypto subs. So what? That just makes them easier to keep an eye on, doesn't it? Stay subscribed. Look in regularly. And read (and maybe even upvote and comment in occasionally) all those posts that aren't about the good old days, or silly dog/pinapple pics.
Maybe that way, THESE will become 'the good old days'. Think about that. :)
submitted by Fulvio55 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Cloud mining – scam or a great opportunity?

When it comes to mining cryptocurrencies, we hear a lot of success stories about how people are earning hundreds of dollars a week by a simple investment. With success stories, businesses that might want to take advantage of gullible and enthusiastic investors looking for quick ways to get rich start to appear. Cloud mining companies may belong to the latter, or they might offer their customers easy and convenient ways to invest in mining.
The process of mining is fairly simple. Investors purchase a computer system with a computing power, that starts to work on a “puzzle”, to put it in simple terms. Once a miner finds the answer to the puzzle, it gets a reward in the form of cryptocurrency. The likelihood of finding the answer depends on the computing power, or “hashing power” as you have likely seen it referred to. Different miners have different hashing power, which is measured in Gigahertz per second. Costs of owning a miner include the initial cost of the hardware plus electricity, maintenance, and cooling costs.
Although this process sounds simple, not everyone with the money to invest prefers to go through this process. This is where cloud mining comes in. There are companies that own miners and sell hashing power to people around the world. Investors can purchase hashing power for a certain fee and earn rewards. Rewards in case of cloud mining are likely to be less as they have to be split with providers.
Cloud mining should not be confused with web mining, which is the process of mining through the web browsers of website users.
Beware of the scams! The vast majority of companies offering cloud mining services are Ponzi schemes aiming to defraud investors. These companies do not own actual miners, but rather distribute portions of new participants fees to old ones to show returns and attract new customers.
In 2015, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission found GAW Miners guilty of collecting investments that would never show returns. The company sold millions of worth of these products without owning any mining operations.
Tried and tested cloud mining companies
These are the most trusted cloud mining providers in the industry:
Genesis Mining
Founded in 2013, Genesis Mining has mining operations in Iceland, where electricity is relatively inexpensive. The company offers services for most major cryptocurrencies with an attractive feature to reallocate computing resources to either at any time. If a customer suddenly decides to mine Bitcoin instead of Litecoin, they can do so instantaneously.
Hashnest
Bitmain, a mining hardware manufacturer that also operates one of the largest mining pools – Antpool, founded Hashnest in 2014. It has most of its mining operations located in China.
Hashing24
Operating since 2016, Hashing24 partnered up with one of the biggest names in mining – Bitfury. It offers customers contracts for 36 months. An interesting feature is a demo version that allows customers to simulate investment in Bitcoin mining contract.
submitted by SwitchKanun to hashflareinfo [link] [comments]

DCMU (Dogecoin Miners Union) Token Update

Wanted to provide everyone with some updates and options on how we should proceed. If anyone is interested in what we’re doing I’ve posted my original thread below with some modifications.
First off, this is a lot of fun. Sort of like our community garden except the garden is a “crypto-asset fund”. A way for us to micro invest with small amounts of dogecoin. I’ve spread out investment so far between Genesis Mining, GAW and BMine on Havelock Investments.
I’ve made some changes to our current evaluation and sent everyone double their initial tokens if you didn’t notice; again because we’re still a small group. Also I propose to make 75% our base line for reinvestment into the fund for the same reason.
One thing we need decide is pay distribution isn’t currently an option using Doge via Dogeparty
https://wiki.counterparty.io/w/Sendmany I’m no programmer so if anyone is interested in helping out that be great, for the time being I don’t mind manually sending out payments but if we grow in size where that is a bit much, we may need to make payments in XDP, what are your thoughts?
as a foot note i want it clear this is not a business just a fun little project for something to do.
Hey Shibes, Rather than invest in a company, how about our community? I have created an experimental token based off of Dogeparty called “DCMU” which stands for Dogecoin Miners Union and is inspired by a bitcoin asset I hold which has investments in cloud mining/havelock and a few other bitcoin investments. DCMU is a token which represents a community "crypto-asset" investment fund, and pays out Doge interest every Sunday based on the earnings during that week. It’s aimed at providing shibes a steady stream of Dogecoin, hopefully to tip with.
How does it work?
There are 10,000 total units of DCMU in existence. Every week, all income received from our various investments (currently cloud mining) will be added up and paid out to any address that holds some tokens. Payouts are made in the form of Dogecoin, all tips received will also go towards future investments in the spirit of shibedom. It’s not a get rich quick scheme, just a way for us to invest together as shibes and earn some dogecoin to spend on future moon purchases.
In addition to the weekly payouts, every week a certain amount of the total income earned is reinvested back into the fund (to purchase new shares/investments). This percentage depends on how many unsold tokens there are. For example, if only 2500 of the 10,000 tokens have been sold, then 75% of the weekly payouts are directly re-invested. If 5,000 tokens sold, then only 50% reinvested, and so on.
If all 10,000 tokens are sold, then there is no reinvestment. At that point, a community decision could be made to issue additional tokens and expand the fund further.
In theory, as more tokens get sold, more Dogecoin can be invested in projects, which increases the weekly dividends and in turn increases the price every week.
Ok, so how do I get started?
Make sure you have your Dogeparty compatible wallet setup (http://dogeparty.io/) https://wallet.dogeparty.io Fund your wallet and then send any amount (over 1000) Dogecoin to the funding address: DC3u3k6eCmwrHSNzLFjjmfwkfGZJSjqztQ Wait up to 24 hours (usually a lot faster) to receive your DCMU tokens. **Enjoy your weekly earnings!** 
Tokens given for Dogecoin contributions will be based on the latest Doge/USD exchange rate. General Info Token Name: DCMU Platform: Dogeparty Blockscan: http://dogepartychain.info/asset/DCMU Total Units: 10,000 Tokens Left: 9,912.1187 Current Price: $1 USD/4360 Dogecoin/2 DCMU/Rate avg of $.50 USD per asset Funding Address: DC3u3k6eCmwrHSNzLFjjmfwkfGZJSjqztQ Twitter Updates : https://twitter.com/DCMinersUnion/status/534081447435309056*
submitted by JayeK to dogecoin [link] [comments]

A good way to invest btc?? (without just buying low and selling high)

I wanted to invest my btc just to try it out. First time was some time ago when i bought haslets at Gaw miners. But this seemed to slow and i couldn't really calculate when it would pay of, so i got out early with almost no loss (after spending around $5000+ in different haslets), which turned out to be the best thing ever after it turned into a scam or ponzi scheme 6 months later. (I feel bad for those who lost a lot of money)
But then I found btcjam and bitlendingclub, but after trying for a few weeks, its just to slow and time consuming (btcjam auto invest is terrible and invest terrible, and bitlendingclub requires sitting long periods of time just choosing people to lend out very small amounts to).. I have also just started trying to use bitfinex swap trading, investing/lending out $261 as a start, and now after 2 weeks have made a whole $1! (wow - yawn).
What are some alternatives you guys use? I wouldn't mind trying cloud mining again, if it was trustworthy and not just unseen (aka non existing) server parks as with gaw miners. I'm just not to thrilled about buying and selling bitcoins as this haven't given me much luck previous. I would rather just lend out and only get profit :)
submitted by Kazaa99 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Cloudmining and my thoughts on it

WARNING: LOGIC AND LONG READING AND OPINIONS AHEAD
TL;DR at bottom. (Too long, didn't read)
I think that cloud mining just isn't ready. There are a few reasons why, and I will go over them right now.
Cloud mining isn't ready because it's a vey new method and idea. There are some pros and cons of cloud mining, but at this point I see most of them as cons. There are lots of them and I don't feel like gonig through them all but I will go through the important ones.
Cloud mining is, face it, expensive as hell. All my sources are of ZeusHash wich seem to be the lowest prices. It is 16 dollars per Megahash. Doing that calculations; this would pay off in about 142 days (litecoin) and that is if the exchange rates stay the same. I have absolutely no patience as most people. If you really want to do the math, you would earn eleven cents (USD) every day. That seems like a lot until the exchange rate changes.
Sure, you don't have to manage the hardware and power costs, but here are the cons. You can't modify the hardware or overclock anything. All you see is the "main screen" and you can't see so much as the tempature of the hardware. Power costs? As far as I'm concerned, I can just put a solar pannel on my roof and be on my jolly way. The worst part? It takes away the fun of figuring out computer parts, and you actually have to wear pants (to work) if you want to when Cloud Mining takes over (nerds will understand, we love putting stuff together).
Instead of walking upstairs to trobuleshoot, you would have to go contact the host and run through that. If you are mining alone, the only fees you are paying are the pool fees (if any).
You can also point your miners to anything that you want. With cloud mining, the only options seem to be Bitcoin (and Litecoin on ZeusHash). With your own miners, you can point them to any coin in any pool. You can make them mine for a multi-pool and you aren't stuck with one pool. You are way more free with your hashing power as you should be.
This is how I think cloud mining should run:
You buy the miners. You can choose the pool and change it at any time. Overclocking adds a fee, but a very small one at that. You can set custom payouts, and point your miners to whatever.
This is how cloud mining really runs:
You can't choose your pool or coin. You have no option of when the payouts are, and you can't change the pools.
At this point in time, cloud mining isn't ready. Don't sell your miners and keep them running. Here's what I am doing:
TL;DR:
I'm just buying a TINY bit of hashing power to support the whole idea of Cloud Mining and making it better, but I'll keep my Gaw Miner Fury's running at 2.5 mh/s earning me 28 cents (USD) per day. It's a good idea and it's changing fast. It will be good in the future, but now is not the time to be dumping EVERYTHING into it.
As always, to the moon!
submitted by Mrbear235 to dogecoin [link] [comments]

GAW Miners Hashlet Review for Scrypt LTC DOGE Zen Cloud Hashflare Update Day 365 - Live Purchase - Bitcoin Cloud Mining - Bitcoin Passive Income Genesis Mining Vs GAW Miners, Day 126 How to Mine Bitcoin with Genesis-Mining.com

GAW Miners have been getting some criticism when they have announced the Hashlets earlier this year as a different form for cloud mining, and now they will probably be getting some for the HashStaker. What they are doing however is not just announcing some random products hoping that they can make miners happy with them by giving them the chance to make some profit, they are creating a whole ... GAW Miners was a popular and reputable source of crypto mining equipment around 2014. Garza actually was considered a crypto celebrity and had pull across social media during that time. However, the company switched its strategy from selling physical crypto mining rigs to offering a cloud mining service, offering “hashlets” to customers which represented a certain amount of mining power. GAW Miners, GAW Labs, related companies, and Josh Garza are a recurring theme here. The company, GAW Miners, started as a hardware reseller, focused on Scrypt mining, but eventually expanding to SHA256 and Bitcoin.After that, the company seemed to go off the tracks when it launched it’s cloud-mining “Hashlet”. Garza and associated companies GAW Miners and ZenMiner, are being tried in court for selling $20 million USD worth of a cloud mined product called “hashlets.” The SEC alleges that Garza ... The last few days the guys at GAW Miners have been teasing us with something new and big coming, and there were already some interesting news like the purchase of the domain name BTC.com and the acquisition of a controlling stake in cloud mining provider ZenMiner. The big news that we were waiting for however is the introduction of the Hashlet, or as they call it the world’s first digital ...

[index] [3934] [41204] [3089] [12177] [22723] [3035] [50757] [41815] [8137] [35429]

GAW Miners Hashlet Review for Scrypt LTC DOGE Zen Cloud

This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue In this video I quickly review the new Hashlet from GAW Miners and overview the Zencloud Mining Control Panel. In this Hashlet Review I cover both the Pro's and Con's of the device, as well as ... Start Cloud Mining Bitcoin, Ethereum, Dash & More With One Of The Top 3 Most Trusted And Profitable Cloud Mining Services In The World! Sign Up for Hashflare... The world best cloud mining service. Make money here with ease! Go the link below to find more information!! http://goo.gl/AYMZXB *****... Register here : https://goo.gl/38CRbo Copy and paste -UCmFNG- promo code provides instant discount at Genesis-Mining: Learn more about cryptocurrencies mining and cloud mining. genesis mining ...

#